48 Arrests at Fossil Free Yale Protest…

48 Arrests at Fossil Free Yale Protest…

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Guest failing grades to Yale from David Middleton

YPD arrests 48 people at divestment sit-in

LORENZO ARVANITIS & SERENA CHO 7:55 PM, DEC 08, 2018

STAFF REPORTERS

The Yale Police Department arrested 48 people — the vast majority of whom were Yale undergraduates — on Friday, ending a five-hour sit-in at the lobby of the Yale Investments Office. A coalition of student groups, including Fossil Free Yale and Despierta Boricua, organized the event to protest Yale’s holdings in the fossil fuel industry and Puerto Rican debt.

Forty-three students, two graduate students, two New Haven residents and one faculty member — history professor Jennifer Klein — were cited for trespassing after refusing to leave the lobby of the Yale Investments Office after 5 p.m. — the time the Investments Office closes. In an interview with the News, University spokesperson Tom Conroy said police officers informed the students that the building was closing at 5 p.m., and that they would be given a ticket if they chose to remain in the lobby.

[…]

Yale News

If these bozos really want a fossil-free Yale, they were protesting in the wrong part of campus.

They need to be protesting where the fossils are…

Is it a grammar thing? Or is it a laziness thing? Or is it just plain stupidity?

  • Climate change or climate science “denier” gets shortened to climate denier.
  • Fossil fuel “free” gets shortened to fossil free.

In both cases, the shortened phrase makes to person uttering it look like a total moron.

Of course, anyone who thinks that student protests are going to have any effect on this…

Source: BP 2018 Statistical Review of World Energy

Is dumb enough to think that government bureaucrats can amend the laws of physics.

For that matter… Do any of these Yalie geniuses have the slightest clue as to where their heating, cooling, hot water and electricity come from?

Energy Management at Yale University

Thermal energy for most buildings in the Central and Science areas of the Yale campus is produced in the Central Power Plant. The Sterling Power Plant serves the Medical School Area and Yale New Haven Hospital. Steam and chilled water produced in the plants are distributed to the buildings in underground tunnels or in direct buried pipes. Electricity is either purchased from the utility company or generated in the Central co-generation plant and distributed for the central and science areas of the campus.

[…]

Production & Distribution of Energy

Steam is produced in the power plant burning either natural gas or oil with maximum efficiency and minimum pollution. It is distributed underground to the buildings where it is used for either direct heating, for re-heating of hot water for heating, and use in the showers, bathrooms, etc., or as process steam used in the kitchen, laboratories, etc. Steam releases its energy (in radiators, heat exchangers, etc), and is returned to the power plant as the most efficient feed water for the boilers, since it retains its thermal energy (120-180 °F), and is chemically treated.

[…]

Utilities & Energy Management

It doesn’t help that Yale’s management is almost as dumb as the students…

Energy Initiative

Turbines atop Becton Center

The production and use of energy from fossil fuels impacts our climate and community, and has become increasingly expensive as resources become scarcer. As a result of these impacts, in 2005 Yale President, Richard Levin, committed the University to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions 43% below 2005 levels by 2020. Further, the Sustainability Plan 2025 Climate Action Ambition commits Yale to carbon neutrality by 2050. To accomplish this ambitious goal, Yale University has embarked upon an ambitious energy program improving the efficiency of its power plants, updating buildings, utilizing emerging technologies, searching for clean energy alternative sources as part of its energy use portfolio, and investigating the use of carbon offsets. To learn more about how Yale is progressing toward its goal click here.

Equally important, however, are the patterns and habits of energy use by students, faculty, staff and administrators. The example we set, as individuals and as a community, is also important as the rest of the world tackles its own energy challenges.

Energy Initiative

This is worth repeating:

Further, the Sustainability Plan 2025 Climate Action Ambition commits Yale to carbon neutrality by 2050. To accomplish this ambitious goal, Yale University has embarked upon an ambitious energy program improving the efficiency of its power plants, updating buildings, utilizing emerging technologies, searching for clean energy alternative sources as part of its energy use portfolio, and investigating the use of carbon offsets.

Click on the “energy program” link…

The “click here” link did work…

From the President

A New Sustainability Vision

As a higher education institution with a global presence, Yale is committed to sustainability planning and actions that forge new paths. The nine ambitions described in the Yale Sustainability Plan 2025 offer a set of unifying priorities to help foster academic exploration, encourage dialogue that spans academic disciplines, and create new ties between Yale’s operations and its teaching and research mission.

Yale is committed to academic leadership in the sciences, social sciences, arts, and humanities, and to providing a campus learning environment that cultivates innovators, leaders, pioneers, and entrepreneurs in all fields and for all sectors of society. This plan outlines programming and priorities related to academic exploration, diversity, and collaboration—all vital components of the vision for a more unified and interconnected Yale.

In 1716 Yale University moved to New Haven, Connecticut. As we commemorate this tercentennial, it is extraordinary to consider what New Haven and Yale will be like three hundred years from now. This plan—with its nine ambitions and nine-year time frame—is the first step of what we hope will be a remarkable journey.

Peter Salovey, President and Chris Argyris, Professor of Psychology

Maybe my eyes were rolling too much, but was there anything in A New Sustainability Vision related to energy?  And WTF would a psychology professor know about energy infrastructure?

So… Yale’s pathway to carbon neutrality is:

Improving the efficiency of its power plants, updating buildings, utilizing emerging technologies, searching for clean energy alternative sources as part of its energy use portfolio, and investigating the use of carbon offsets.

Basically, waiting for Unicorns and paying for other people to decarbonize… Don’t they still teach engineering at Yale?

Apparently they do, or at least did as recently as 2010…

Becton windmills raise quixotic questions

KATIE FALLOON 4:10 AM, APR 06, 2010

Last May, 10 one-kilowatt wind turbines were installed on top of the Becton Engineering and Applied Science Center to remind passing Yalies of the University’s sustainability efforts. But almost a year later, the turbines’ actual economic and energy savings value is still unclear.

While Tom Downing, the Office of Facilities’ senior energy engineer, said the turbines will pay for themselves, not including the cost of installation, in about eight years, two Yale engineering faculty members interviewed said they are skeptical the small turbines can generate enough electricity to be cost-effective.

The turbines — meant to serve as a sign of Yale’s commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 43 percent below 2005 levels by 2020 — were built by the energy firm AeroVironment, Inc., and cost $5,000 each, Downing said. He said the manufacturers estimated the turbines would generate about 26,000 kilowatt hours of electricity annually, which is equal to or about half of 1 percent of the Becton Center’s annual electricity needs and will reduce the University’s carbon dioxide emissions by about 20,000 pounds. (This data is based on the assumption that the turbines will be spinning about 30 percent of the time over a one-year period, Downing said.)

But engineering and applied physics professor Paul Fleury and engineering design advisor and lecturer Glenn Weston-Murphy said they are skeptical about the turbines’ efficiency. To have an energy-saving impact, there would need to be many more small turbines on top of Becton Center, which is not feasible because of limited space and zoning issues, Fleury said.

“I don’t know where the 26 megawatt hours came from, but it is at best very optimistic,” Weston-Murphy said, adding that he did not know whether the turbines would ever pay for themselves completely.

So far there have been no reliable data on the electricity actually generated by the turbines, Downing said.

[…]

Yale News

A Google for the Becton Center wind turbines took me to Yale’s functioning sustainability page… And it’s a HOOT!  There’s not a lot of detail on Yale’s energy infrastructure; but there’s enough to determine that Yale is about 97% fossil fueled…

 Capacity MW  MWh/yr Capacity Factor
Central Power Plant                 38.60
Gas turbines (3)                 18.30
Diesel generators (3)                   4.50
Combustion turbines (2)                 15.80
Sterling Power Plant                 15.00
Co-generation                 15.00
Fossil Fuel                 53.60
Becton Micro Wind Turbines                   0.01              25 29%
Fisher Hall
Soalr PV              45
Kroon Hall
Solar array                   0.10
West Campus Solar Array
Solar array                   1.34         1,600 14%
Renewables                   1.45

 

The much ballyhooed Becton Center wind turbine installation has an installed capacity of 0.01 MW… But it does appear to deliver nearly a 30% capacity factor.  From my recollection of my years in New Haven, it was always windy… But not that sunny.  The YUGE 1.34 MW West Campus Solar Array rates a 14% capacity factor.

West Campus Solar Array

Location: 750 West Campus Drive, West Haven, CT 06516

Description: A solar array atop the Storage and Receiving Center generating 1/5 of West Campus’s energy demand

Did you know? The Solar Array includes 4,400 panels covering close to 2 acres of roof top

  • 1.34 megawatt solar installation
  • Generates 1.6 million kilowatt-hours of electricity annually
  • Offsets the equivalent of more than 16,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide over the life of the system
  • Delivered an eight-fold increase in the university’s on-site renewable energy generation

An eight-fold increase over slightly more than zero-point-zero is not exactly something to brag about.  The highlight of Yale’s first solar installation, Fisher Hall, was that it delivered “17% of [the single] building’s energy demand.”

 

 

Superforest,Climate Change

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